Tuesday, 15 November 2011

A Family Outing

On one of the blogs I have recently begun to follow, the author shows pictures of his family which, even without the accompanying quotes and comments, reveal his love for them. Now, I'd love to show you a picture I took of my parents and my sister on Sunday, but they won't have it - I am strictly forbidden to post pictures of people other than myself, and of course I respect their decision in spite of not fully understanding it.

Still, I can tell you about what we did on Sunday, and show pictures of the event without letting you see my Mystery Family :-)

My home town Ludwigsburg is famous for its castle; I've posted pictures of it several times before, for instance here and here.
It is said to be Germany's biggest Baroque castle still standing, and visitors can go for a guided tour in the state rooms, something I have done so many times (and will keep doing) that I could be a tour guide myself.

Last Sunday, though, a small trade fair was held in and around the castle: several companies of Ludwigsburg and the surrounding area presented themselves and their products. There were stalls where you could buy food, such as the delicious Flammkuchen being baked on site in a big wood oven, jewellery, toys, clothes, Christmas and other ornaments, wine, cosmetics, lingerie and more; there was also a stall of one of several dance schools, advertising for new participants in their courses, a choir, a band and an exhibition about the challenges encountered and the methods used in restoring to their former glory the wall paintings, wooden doors and printed wallpaper serveral centuries old that adorn the castle.
Most interesting for me were not the people or the companies and their products, but the rooms we got to see - these are rooms not normally part of the tour, and I was able to see corners and stair cases and small rooms in the castle where I have never set foot before.

It was lovely to spend this sunny but cold November afternoon with my family, just the four of us, and I hope to convey some of it with these pictures - without acutally showing the most important people attending :-)

View from the South terrace/balcony towards the "tiny hunting lodge" that was built there in order for the Duke of W├╝rttemberg to have parties and dinners with his hunting friends and other guests. 
It was still overcast when we arrived at around noon. The dinosaurs to the left are the remnants of the pumpkin exhibition and will not stay there.


 The same view, zoomed in.


 Flammkuchen, straight from the oven! There is mulled wine in the glass behind it.


A little later, the sun came out, and it turned out be yet another glorious SUNday. Cars are not permitted into the inner courtyard of the castle; the one you can see to the left is part of a car dealer's exhibition that was allowed for the day.



 Ever wanted a red Porsche? Well, you probably didn't have this one in mind :-)



There will be a seperate post about some of the odd or beautiful detail I photographed, as well as the ceiling and wall paintings.

11 comments:

  1. What nice pictures and there is something specially exciting about learning of new rooms somewhere familiar. The castle looks fantastic. It's interesting, though, becuase in England this would be called a "stately home" and not a castle. (I think the word "Schloss" in German does not differentiate between the two types, but here we expect a castle to look like Windsor Castle or Leeds Castle, with thick walls and a keep and preferably arrow slits, a porcullis and a moat! )

    I can understand why your family don't want their pictures used. I don't usually put identifiable images of people associated with me on my blog (the image of the dear little happy boys on my blog was snapped casually, I don't know them and I have not even said where in the world they were, as you will notice)

    There are unfortunately some sad and peculiar people out there and they can misuse images and information. There are also spiteful people or people who make up stuff .... eech.....

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  2. Hello:
    What an absolutely wonderful photograph of the avenue of trees leading to the 'hunting lodge'. So bold and dramatic, heightened by the symmetry of the planting and the building so perfectly framing the view. This we should love to see.

    The Fair sounds to have been such fun but, yes, we can totally identify with your excitement at being able to see into hidden areas of the castle which are usually out of bounds. Although state rooms pimped and preened for the public are of interest, it is those behind the scenes places offering a glimpse into real lives that hold the greatest intrigue for us. We look forward to reading more.

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  3. Jenny, the German word for a castle with a keep and moat etc. is Burg. Schloss is different in that it is meant to enhance the glory of the monarch and impress everyone by its rich beauty, whereas a Burg has defence and protection as its main reason for being.

    So far, I have only made good experience with people I know from and met through the internet; maybe I have just been very lucky!

    Jane and Lance, I am glad you like the picture. Symmetry always holds much appeal for me; some people think I am boring in wanting everything to be neat and tidy, but I do also see the dramatic effects. And to explore hidden areas and catch glimpses behind the scenes is something I find very exciting!

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  4. Oh, thank you for taking me to this beautiful castle and grounds!
    I wonder about that red tractor. So Porsche makes tractors? Is it for plowing? Sorry, but we must know, would love to tell my farming Dad about it! "Ever wanted a red Porsche" , you are funny...but my Dad would LOVE the tractor version!

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  5. Thank you for sharing your outing with us. Love the picture of your Porsche :-)

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  6. Kay, Porsche used to make (and probably still does) motors not just for fancy sports cars but also for tractors, just as Mercedes/Daimler still make motors for buses and trucks. I have no idea what the thing mounted to the Porsche tractor is for, but I guess it can be changed to any other farming equipment necessary for work on the fields.

    Jarmara, you are welcome! Glad you like it :-)

    Frances, thank you!

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  7. Partner-who-loves-tea has always wanted a red Porsche. One birthday I gave her a little Dinky model one. I wish I'd known there were tractors. I wonder if they do models of them as well.
    It's a pity we cannot see your family but at least we have got to know them over time through their activities and celebrations.

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  8. Scriptor, I am sure you'll find a Porsche tractor model - is there anything that is NOT available through the internet today?

    I went to lunch at my parents' today and we were talking about the photo issue. My mum said she has no problem with having her picture shown; she just very rarely likes the way she looks on photos. So, if I find one she likes, I may post it :-)

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  9. The 'thing' on the tractor is, I think, for trimming hedging and the like.

    I, too, love castles and stately homes because it provides an opportunity to see what things were like in the past from physical and, to some extent, social aspects. I have been through various ones in Germany (principally Bavaria) and have sometimes been astonished by their locations.

    I think the question of being identified on a blog is a difficult one. I think if I were much younger and still working I might be reluctant given the nature of my employment before I retired from being a bureaucrat and became a potter. As it is there's nothing likely to be published now that I care about being in the public domain. I hope I don't live to regret those words!

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  10. Thank you, GB, for explaining about the tractor "thing"!

    Here at the castle/stately home, they give different guided tours; some, for instance, deal with what court protocol prescriped to a visitor, which rooms he would have been allowed to see; there is also a tour from the point of view of one of the manservants (the guide is dressed in a costume of the time), and so on.

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