Tuesday, 10 November 2015

Autumnal Woodland, Part II

In my previous post, I told you about the boar enclosure we came past on our walk.

Much to my surprise, there were little ones there - even VERY little ones -, and there was a lot going on: the little ones play-chasing the very little ones, the middle-sized ones sunbathing and enjoying people scratching their ears and patting their backs through the fence, and the adult ones looking on, sometimes as if shaking their heads and muttering "kids..." to themselves.




I really had not expected to see such young boar at this time of year, but there they were, very active, the smallest of them not even the size of an average cat!

Several other people, some of them families with children, stood near the fence to watch, as did we. It wasn't boring for a second:

video

video

Please let me know whether these videos (taken with a mobile phone) work for you - it is the first time I use such videos on my blog.


Eventually, we moved on; we were only about half way to the place we were actually headed to. That will be the subject of my next post.

12 comments:

  1. The videos work fine Meike! As the piggies seem to be silent ones, it would have been good if you could have added a soundtrack by grunting intermittently during the filming! And how cute are those piglets!

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    1. Turn the volume on your computer up and you'll hear not only the squealing of the little piggies ("Mummeeeee - he's pushed me!" - "Did not!" - "Did too!") but also the voices of some of the people watching. Don't strain your ears too much, though - I kept quiet throughout.

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  2. I have never seen this sort of piglet and they have all the cuteness of most baby animals...The videos were great. A few times the pixels seemed fewer than one might want, but only for a second, and how fun it was to see the little boars trotting around.

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    1. They are common boar, Kristi, the kind that used to roam the forests all across Europe for centuries, and in some of our larger wooded areas still is, causing much damage to fields and plantation when not kept in check.
      The little ones really were super cute!

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  3. The videos do not work on my iPad, but that could be because mine is older. The pictures are wonderful, though!

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    1. Shame you can't watch the videos, but I expected this kind of problem for some of my readers and therefore made sure I also had some photos to post.

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  4. The videos work fine on my computer but not on my mobile (checked because of Mimi's comment above). The little ones are cute :) I can only recall seeing wild boars once and they were in an enclosure too, in a kind of tourist park showing life in... stone/bronze/iron age I think... (my visit there was 20 years ago or more, so don't really recall all the details...)

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    1. There are several places not too far from me where boar and deer can be seen; wildlife parks and of course the big zoo in Stuttgart. I've never come across boar in the wild, though (and am not really keen on such an encounter, to be honest!).

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  5. The little ones are so cute! Here in Sicily recently there have been many cases of boars attacking people in the national park so they're trying to solve this problem. What a shame that the videos don't work, maybe it's my computer.

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    1. Sorry that the videos don't work for you, Francesca. The little ones really are super cute, and it is amazing how fast they grow into such huge animals that have no cuteness left. I wouldn't want to come across them without a sturdy fence between us, either!

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  6. The videos worked fine for me Meike (using Apple laptop) and I was wondering if one of the voices was yours but I see from the comments that you kept quiet. Shame!

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    1. To be honest, I'm not keen on having my readers hear my voice - I think of my voice as ok normally, but whenever I hear a recording of myself, I find it comes across very different from what I thought it would sound like.

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